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Spelt

Spelt Spelt, (triticum speltum) is an ancient variety of wheat that has a mellow, nutty flavor and an extremely high protein value. It is a variety of soft wheat. Spelt berries look like pointy grains of rice that are extremely light brown in color. The hull for spelt is a lot tougher than the common variety of wheat. Spelt was originally grown in 5,000 to 6,000 BC around Iran, but has only been in America for a little over 100 years. It is the forerunner of the European wheat grown today. It is very difficult to grow, so there are not many plants available. Hulled spelt is easily digestible, with the highest protein value of most grains. It can be used like rice, barley, or farro. W

Jicama

Jicama Jicama is a large, bulbous, root vegetable. (Pronounced heek-a-mah). It is also known as the Mexican turnip, Mexican potato, Mexican yam, or yam bean. This plant was originally exported from the Spanish to the Philippines in the 17th century. Jicama comes from the Aztec word xicamalt. They used its seeds as medicine. Jicama is also one of the four elements honored during the Festival of the Dead on November 1st in Mexico. Jicama is a starchy, edible root. It has thin, brown, papery skin that must be removed before eating. The flesh is crispy and white. It can be eaten cooked or raw. It has a flavor similar to raw potato and apple. Jicama won’t discolor when cut. The root

Kantola

Kantola Kantola (Momordica dioica, or M. cochinchinensis) is a curious little gourd, commonly found in Indian in Southern Asian cuisines. Sometimes it is called the spiny gourd or teasle gourd. This little fruit is covered in little spines, but they aren’t sharp. When the fruit is ripe- it changes from dark green to light green. When it turns to yellow- it gets bitter. Most commonly, this fruit is sliced and used in curries. They are also pickled, or stuffed and steamed. The out layer of skin should be removed before eating. Kantola is related to the bitter melon, but does not resemble it in taste. There are many health benefits that are purported. They are full of phytonutrients an

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© 2016 by Chef Jennifer M. Denlinger.  All Rights Reserved