Get in Touch

  • Facebook App Icon
  • Pinterest App Icon
  • Twitter App Icon
  • Instagram App Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon

© 2016 by Chef Jennifer M. Denlinger.  All Rights Reserved

Join us

  • Facebook App Icon
  • Instagram App Icon
  • Twitter App Icon
  • Pinterest App Icon

December 26, 2017

December 21, 2017

October 8, 2017

April 17, 2017

Please reload

Recent Posts

Here's to a lucky you in 2018

December 29, 2017

1/10
Please reload

Featured Posts

Garlic

June 19, 2014

Garlic

 

Garlic is a member of the lily family (alliums).  It is an edible bulb.  Garlic is an annual bulbous herb.  One head of garlic (called a bulb) is 12- 16 cloves of garlic.  The head is covered in a paper thin white membrane, as well as each clove.  The plant grows long flat leaves.

         All garlic falls under the species allium sativum, which is divided into two subspecies: hardneck and softneck. These, in turn, can be divided into several varieties and sub varieties, creating more than 600 types of garlic.  There are five main varieties of garlic: Artichoke, Rocambole, Porcelain, Silverskin  and Purple Stripe.

         Garlic has been very important throughout history.  It probably originated in western Asia, around the desert of the Kirghiz people.  In about 1500, it was revered as a medicine.  In ancient Egyptian tablets, there were 22 prescriptions with garlic.  Egyptian athletes believed garlic could increase strength and endurance. However, the ancient Greeks disliked garlic and thought it would bring bad luck.  But in another account, Greek athletes used garlic as a stimulant.  Medieval doctors believed garlic would help cure the whopping cough, and it could be used as a charm against witches.  On St. John’s Day, if you purchase garlic, it would keep you safe from poverty from the rest of the year.  In 1858, Louis Pasteur discovered garlic could indeed kill bacteria.  During the crusades, garlic finally reached Western Europe.  Garlic was considered the poor man’s spice.

         There are over 30 varieties of garlic.  Today some of the common forms of garlic include, white garlic, pink garlic, purple garlic, giant or elephant garlic and Spanish garlic.  You can also buy ground garlic, chopped garlic, dried garlic, garlic salt, powdered garlic, roasted garlic, and garlic oil.  The longer you cook garlic, the longer the flavor will deviate.  Young garlic or garlic greens are also a delicacy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elephant Garlic.  One clove is the size of a strawberry.

        

When garlic is bruised, crushed, chopped, or the like, the oils in the garlic will be released, making the dish even more pungent.  Since garlic oils are known to permeate the lungs, the odor of garlic may remain with you for a time, exuding through your breath and skin odor.  Chlorophyll may help to alleviate some of the garlic’s pungency.

Spring Garlic

 

         Garlic contains selenium when eaten in large quantities.  It is a diuretic, stomachic, tonic, antispasmodic, anti-arthritic, antiseptic, and has cleansing properties.  Garlic may also contain allicin, which is beneficial on the cardiovascular system, and contains allyl sulfide, a powerful antibiotic.

 

Garlic Pairings

 

beans

beef

beets

cabbage

chicken

eggplant

fish

lamb

lentils

mushrooms

pasta

pork

potatoes

rice

shellfish

spinach

tomatoes

zucchini

 

© 2014 Chef Jennifer M. Denlinger       All rights reserved

 

Cite me:  Denlinger, J.  (2014, June 14). Garlic.  Retrieved from:  FloridaChef.net

 

Tags:

Please reload

Feasting Florida

Enjoying a sustainable, organic, lifestyle indulging in all Florida's Cuisines throughout the seasons

Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square